Confirmation

Confirmation

Confirmation at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church is done through the Religious Education program (CCD) for children or through the RCIA program for adults. For information about our CCD program, please visit our Religious Education page. For information about our RCIA program for adults, please visit our RCIA page.

WHAT IS CONFIRMATION?
Baptism, the Eucharist, and the sacrament of Confirmation together constitute the “sacraments of Christian initiation,” whose unity must be safeguarded. It must be explained to the faithful that the reception of the sacrament of Confirmation is necessary for the completion of baptismal grace.  For “by the sacrament of Confirmation, [the baptized] are more perfectly bound to the Church and are enriched with a special strength of the Holy Spirit. Hence they are, as true witnesses of Christ, more strictly obliged to spread and defend the faith by word and deed.” Catechism of the Catholic Church 1285 

Just as bodies and minds grow, Catholics believe that the soul also needs to grow in the life of grace.  The sacrament of Confirmation builds on the sacraments of Baptism, Reconciliation, and Holy Communion, completing the process of initiation into the Catholic community. 

Confirmation establishes young adults as complete and mature members of the faith. This sacrament is called Confirmation because the faith given in Baptism is now confirmed and made strong. During your Baptism, your parents and godparents make promises to renounce Satan and believe in God and the Church on your behalf. At Confirmation, you renew those same promises, this time speaking for yourself.

During Confirmation, the focus is on the Holy Spirit, who confirmed the apostles on Pentecost and gave them courage to practice their faith. Catholics believe that the same Holy Spirit confirms Catholics during the Sacrament of Confirmation and gives them the same gifts-wisdom, understanding, counsel, courage, knowledge, piety, and fear of the Lord. These gifts are supernatural graces given to the soul. 

 The Confirmation ceremony may take place at Mass and the presiding bishop wears red vestments to symbolize the red tongues of fire seen hovering over the heads of the apostles at Pentecost. Each person wishing to be confirmed comes forward with his or her sponsor, who may or may not be one of the godparents chosen for Baptism.

Being confirmed in the Church means accepting responsibility for your faith and destiny. Adulthood, even young adulthood, means that you must do what’s right on your own, not for the recognition or reward but merely because it’s the right thing to do.